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Tag: improve listening skills

Put on the brakes | Using pause to improve communication

Cornerstone Coaching and Training

When you are in a hole, stop digging. ~ Ian McIver   Pause [pawz]  – temporary stop or rest, especially in speech or action. Do you ever wonder how you get yourself in the communication situations you do?  It starts out okay, then you speak up and something goes wrong?  You don’t say what you mean, or, you say too much, or, it just doesn’t go well at all?   Yeah, me too. That’s exactly why I’m sharing with you my #1 tip for avoiding a communication problem.  It’s called: PAUSE! Pausing is more than just a moment in time. It

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Just shut up and listen to me!

Cornerstone Coaching and Training

One of the most important communication skill that we can all improve on is listening.  Ever want to just shout – “Hey – shut up and listen to me!”?  Most of us have, and, I hate to break it to you, someone has probably wanted to shout that at you as well. Which of the following have you ever thought about (be honest) while someone is talking to you? • Get to the point. • I already know the punch line. I’m way ahead. • This is boring, I’m checking out. • I wonder what I should have for dinner.

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How to improve your listening: my top 10 success tips

Cornerstone Coaching and Training

It takes two to speak the truth — one to speak and another to hear. ~ Thoreau Ever feel like you could use a list of best practices for listening?  Well, here you go. The following are my top 10 success tips for improving your listening skills. Now, here’s a 2-step process for how to make the most of this list: 1) Read it over and note which areas you already do well in and then circle the ones that you could improve on. 2) Take one that you have circled and make a plan to on it this week. 

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Listening: the Key to Good Communication

Cornerstone Coaching and Training

God gave us two ears and one mouth because we are designed to listen twice as much as we talk. Rachel Naomi Remen was right when she wrote in her book Kitchen Table Wisdom about the importance of listening: “Listening is the oldest and perhaps the most powerful tool of healing. It is often through the quality of our listening and not the wisdom of our words that we are able to effect the most profound changes in the people around us.” “I suspect that the most basic and powerful way to connect to another person is to listen. Just

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